Doctor as Designer   When Joyce Lee, M.D., M.P.H., took her sabbatical at Stanford, she discovered design and design thinking and her whole approach to life was turned upside-down. And she has never been more excited. When you see the transformation that just her office took (check out her blog here) into become a collaborative space, or how she approaches life with her two children and family, it's evident that design thinking has radically transformed her work and life for the better. We were able to catch Dr. Lee during her busy schedule to connect online and have an amazing conversation about design thinking in health care, patients as part of the collaborative process, and how design enables people to power their own health. Catch the whole conversation after the break!

    Written by Nitya Chandiramani   The word success evokes a variety of images, conjures a diverse range of definitions, and hold meanings unique to every individual. To some degree, people are socialized to think of success as a linear path. Typically, tangible goals...

  Patch Adams   One of our most popular videos from Transform has been from the amazing Patch Adams. Five years later, he is still clowning around the globe with his clown tours, and making children laugh and smile in countless ways. Enjoy his awe inspiring talk after the break!  

      Engaging and supporting your staff improves the patient experience ( Health Service Journal ). Data Silos: Health care's Silent Shame ( Forbes ). Apple has it's sights on clinical trials ( Washington Post ). Health care systems try to cut costs by aiding...

  Post Written by Joyce Lee, M.D., M.P.H., originally featured on Medium Patient problem or healthcare problem?   Upon the recommendation of colleagues, I have been reading a fantastic book by famed designer, Alan Cooper, titled The Inmates are Running the Asylum. It’s a...

    Post Written by Dominique Pandy   When Transform presenter Elisabeth Rosenthal, M.D. began writing Paying Till It Hurts for the New York Times, health care consumers readily sacrificed their privacy and offered up their own experiences so their stories could be told....

    Post by Ronald Amodeo Our current knowledge traps business leaders from rapidly assimilating something new. What heuristic can help? At a TED conference in 2006, Hans Rosling (Professor of International Health at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden) described a "pre-test" he had given...

    Post Written By Nitya Chandiramani   “You have been diagnosed with (insert disease).” Those six simple words that physicians so easily declare can transform an individual from a powerful person to a powerless patient. That was the experience encountered by social scientist...

How do you change culture?

Post originally featured on Pritpal Tamber's website.

It’s our lifestyles that are the problem. Our habits are making us sick. Our cultural norms are fueling the rise in chronic conditions. The solution is simple: we have to change our culture. We've all heard versions of this message but its alleged simplicity is also its absurdity. What is culture? Where does it come from? And how does it change? I've heard it said that our culture resides in the stories we tell. Although I can understand that, I have always struggled to see it as a target for intervention. And yet, if culture really is at the heart of what’s making us sick, we have no choice but to explore it as an option. The question is, how?