OpenIdeoBlogPostRealisation The following post was written by Ashley Jablow on the OpenIDEO website.   In our Healthy Ageing Challenge, OpenIDEO community members from across the globe came together to explore what health, wellbeing and ageing mean to them. Sharing over 300 inspirations and collaboratively designing 134 ideas, our community gravitated toward solutions that nurtured intergenerational and peer-to-peer relationships, celebrated and incentivised active lifestyles, cared for our caregivers, empowered people to plan for their futures and designed environments for thriving at every age. In the end, six winning ideas were chosen by the community, our challenge sponsor Mayo Clinic and OpenIDEO. While the challenge ended in late August, our momentum has continued to build since then. In September, Mayo Clinic's Center for Innovation hosted the 2013 Transform Symposium, a three-day, multi-disciplinary convening around health, innovation and design. Mayo Clinic, feeling inspired by our challenge and our community's efforts, decided to extend a last-minute invitation to OpenIDEO community members T. Annie Nguyen and Sylvia Stein to present their winning ideas during a 60-person workshop. Facilitated by IDEO's Gretchen Addi, the workshop was attended by a range of healthcare professionals, architects, designers and journalists, and served as a great chance for Annie and Sylvia to get feedback on their ideas.

Imagine you are a nurse making night rounds. You show up for work and the nurse before you shares that one of the patients in your care tonight will most likely not make it through the evening. He of course...

Transform2013Recap The Transform symposium took stage for the sixth year, bringing together people to collaborate on an ongoing dialogue to create meaningful and transformational change to health care. They came from across the globe, connecting not only in the physical space of the symposium, but also in our Community, On24 Virtual Conference, Twitter, Facebook, and even Second Life. We were honored to have the very talented John Hockenberry to moderate this year’s symposium, and the presenters that graced the stage were second to none. Thought-provoking discussions ranged from the need and benefits of distraction-free family dinners, innovative conceptual designs of wearable tech by local 5th graders, to redefining the word “care.” To close the conference, and unsuspecting presenter, Daniel Lamarre, President and CEO of Cirque du Soleil, entranced the audience with a presentation that brought the entire experience together.
UMR Student Writer Lauren SmithGuest Post by Senior University of Minnesota-Rochester Student, Lauren Smith   Flabbergasted, awe-struck, impressed; those were my feelings after the presentation from the designer and researcher J. Paul Neeley. To me he is the man who has given up everything that I could never imagine living without. I commend him for the research and discoveries he has made regarding what makes for true happiness in life. The definition of happiness between the two of us would be drastically different; however, I feel that he has found a long lasting version of it. If I were to describe happiness I would think Christmas surrounded by the ones I love all eating good food and opening presents. It might be going shopping for new clothes to wear out on a date night. Or maybe going out late at night to a restaurant with my close girlfriends and chatting and gorging on food and drinks till it closes. Life is revolved around being happy. Every decision that an individual makes takes into account how happy, or unhappy, it will make them. But, are modern day technologies inhibiting our abilities to be happy and life a full life? Neeley states, “I realized that much of our modern world and technology is actually antithetical to our happiness.” If so why are we burdening ourselves with such depressive material objects and technologies?

“A five minute car ride helped us solve our challenge with resident duty hour restrictions.” That is what a transplant surgeon at Mayo Clinic said when we interviewed him about communication within the Department of Surgery. He told us the...

As part of the primary research for our six-month long research and design project entitled, What Ifs, Ahas and Now Whats?: Designing for the Creative Process of Behavior Change, my design partners, Marnie Meylor and Matthew Gardner, and I created...

After a six-month long research and design project around behavior change, my design partner, Marnie Meylor, and I decided to present our work through an exhibition rather than a traditional Power Point. Our exhibition entitled, “What If’s, Aha’s and Now...