Post written by Pritpal S Tamber     Over the last two-and-a-half months we published a series on Stanford Social Innovation Review (SSIR) that explored what it would mean for communities to be involved in the design, implementation, and evaluation of health interventions....

      Post written by Pritpal S Tamber   One question has surfaced a few times over the last few weeks, and I wanted to reflect on it here: “How is what you are doing different to public health?”   Public health, according to Wikipedia, is: the science and...

  Pritpal-S-Tamber-Medicaid-and-Community   Post written by Pritpal S Tamber   In California, it’s a tale almost worthy of Hollywood. In 2008, Alex Briscoe, the Director of Alameda County’s Health Care Services Agency, stood watching a demonstration against the police after the shooting of a young black man, Oscar Grant III, by a white police officer.  He was there with the Medical Director of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Division that he oversees, and together they watched the angry, largely black, crowd of demonstrators stop yelling at the police when a fire truck went by. Instead of yelling, they waved. To most, this would have been an idle observation but for Briscoe it sparked an idea. He had spent almost 15 years trying to get primary and preventative health care to low-income, largely black, communities. Given that 85% of fire fighters are trained as Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) and that every fire department in the county was contracted to provide EMS, the fire fighters’ unique alliance and standing in the community made them the perfect health care delivery mechanism.

    Blog post written by Pritpal S Tamber   In this post, I am reproducing a chapter from The Alpine Review by Charles Leadbeater. He argues that creating the health systems of tomorrow will mean learning from the developing world, so-called reverse-innovation. He also argues...

    Post written by Pritpal S Tamber   I was in the Netherlands a few weeks ago and met a small group of people trying to think courageously about the future of health. It was invigorating to see such bravery, often in the face...

  Is the way we are working actually working?   I (AJ) met Pritpal S Tamber in 2013 here at the Center for Innovation and was quickly impressed with his insights into health care and his work for transformative change in how we approach innovation within health care. So when we started looking for people who are powering health from many non-traditional ways, his name immediately came to mind. Pritpal S Tamber is the Founder of the Creating Health Collaborative, was the Physician Editor of TEDMED 2013, and has more experience with various foundations and organizations (which we talk about in the podcast) to list here. I am so excited to introduce you to Pritpal S Tamber, and his work through our chat over Skype. Check out his website to read more on his thoughts on health care and innovation, and follow him on Twitter too! Enjoy the podcast after the break.  
How do you change culture?

Post originally featured on Pritpal Tamber's website.

It’s our lifestyles that are the problem. Our habits are making us sick. Our cultural norms are fueling the rise in chronic conditions. The solution is simple: we have to change our culture. We've all heard versions of this message but its alleged simplicity is also its absurdity. What is culture? Where does it come from? And how does it change? I've heard it said that our culture resides in the stories we tell. Although I can understand that, I have always struggled to see it as a target for intervention. And yet, if culture really is at the heart of what’s making us sick, we have no choice but to explore it as an option. The question is, how?
The Future of Health    Guest Post Written By Dr. Pritpal S Tamber There was a moment, when I was sitting stage-side at TEDMED 2013, when I saw the future of health. It wasn’t bright, it wasn’t full of answers; it was complex, plural and a constant struggle. And yet it was full of collegiality, hope and respect. Three talks in particular, truly unravelled me. Sally Okun laid bare how clinicians and patients have completely different ways to describe their illnesses, essentially limiting how much we understand of each other. America Bracho shared how she used members of the community to help decide and shape what health messages to deliver with the local Latino community. Lastly, Sue-Desmond Hellman shrugged and said it was patients who’d decide what innovation is and that the medical profession and industry needed to let them in and accept the messiness of the creative process.