Written by Ronald Amodeo, first posted on LinkedIn   A place exists where innovation happens better than anywhere else. Ideas come in torrents. Experiments occur almost by accident. Failures are so common that people barely pause to ponder them. Every breath brings...

      Engaging and supporting your staff improves the patient experience ( Health Service Journal ). Data Silos: Health care's Silent Shame ( Forbes ). Apple has it's sights on clinical trials ( Washington Post ). Health care systems try to cut costs by aiding...

  Your Environment, Your Health   When the snow starts melting and temperatures turn above freezing here in Minnesota, everyone becomes happier. There's an almost tangible change in everyone's attitude that is powerful. If the changing of the season can have this profound effect on people's well-being, how much of an effect can the environment of a clinical setting have on someone's recovery? This very question was the impetus for what Transform Presenter Susan Mazer, Ph.D., took to create the C.A.R.E. Channel and her Healing Healthcare Systems business. For Dr. Mazer, the environment of the patient's room is critical to not only patient recovery, but also the clinical staff's well-being. In her own personal experience it became evident how the noises around the hospital, the lack of windows and layout of her room all affected her and the staff as they interacted. We connected with Dr. Mazer on Skype to talk with her more about the Patient Experience, and how creating an environment that helped establish a human connection to the patient is beneficial to everyone. Listen to the full conversation after the break!

    Post Written by Dominique Pandy   When Transform presenter Elisabeth Rosenthal, M.D. began writing Paying Till It Hurts for the New York Times, health care consumers readily sacrificed their privacy and offered up their own experiences so their stories could be told....

    Post by Ronald Amodeo Our current knowledge traps business leaders from rapidly assimilating something new. What heuristic can help? At a TED conference in 2006, Hans Rosling (Professor of International Health at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden) described a "pre-test" he had given...

How do you change culture?

Post originally featured on Pritpal Tamber's website.

It’s our lifestyles that are the problem. Our habits are making us sick. Our cultural norms are fueling the rise in chronic conditions. The solution is simple: we have to change our culture. We've all heard versions of this message but its alleged simplicity is also its absurdity. What is culture? Where does it come from? And how does it change? I've heard it said that our culture resides in the stories we tell. Although I can understand that, I have always struggled to see it as a target for intervention. And yet, if culture really is at the heart of what’s making us sick, we have no choice but to explore it as an option. The question is, how?
  Connecting the dots in healthcare social media   Social media in healthcare has, and continues to, radically transform the industry by making old boundaries disappear and connecting people who previously could have never connected before. When Twitter was in it's infancy, Audun Utengen (former Transform presenter) and some friends started to see the potential in utilizing this communication tool, and started cataloging conversations that were taking place by specific hashtags throughout the Twitter sphere. With over 6,000 health-related hashtags now being tracked and searchable, Symplur has become an invaluable resource to connect patients and providers around the world in ways previously unseen. Twitter chats with patients connecting over rare diseases, Journal clubs for providers to learn together, conversations from every area of the globe are put together and saved on Symplur's platform that is free to explore. But don't take our word for it, listen to our conversation with Audun after the break.
MK Czerwiec, a Transform 2013 presenter, is back again with our very own Nic Breutzman, to illustrate how comics work in the patient-provider relationship. MK has been living the mission of using comics as a tool in health care as a tool for communication and healing, and the comic below does the talking best.   MK 1

    Post Written By UMR Writer Haley Pysick   “Culture eats strategy over breakfast” states writer Peter Drucker. While cultural constructs help to develop the United States into its own unique society, it also stifles the development of new ideas and innovation from...