Post written by Samantha Dempsey   What does it mean to design for good? As designers, do we have an obligation to improve the world through the things that we make, or does our obligation lie with those who fund our work?...

    Post written by Susan Mazer   I have been writing about hospital noise for many years. And, I am convinced that much of the conversation and rationale behind reducing noise is wrong. I say that because when we talk about noise as...

    Post written by Eric Anderson   Are you having trouble solidifying your Transform 2015 PechaKucha submission? Here are five prompts that will help you challenge your initial idea, expand the scope of your proposal, and meet this Friday’s deadline.   The Interrogation: Come...

  Talking with Lauren Taylor     Lauren Taylor, co-author of “The American Health Care Paradox,” breaks down the common notion that healthcare equals health. Referencing various health challenges and community initiatives, Taylor states that without recognizing health at a community level, we will not improve health overall. When she came by the Center for Innovation, we sat down to catch up with her since her talk at Transform, and to learn more about what she has been learning since. Listen to the whole chat after the break!
  Nadine-Burke-Harris-MD     Post written by Nadine Burke Harris, M.D.   Three months ago, a TED talk I gave was posted on the Internet, and the emails, calls, and letters began pouring in — from across the country and around the world. Women and men from Texas and Louisiana, Australia and the Czech Republic urged me to do whatever I can to protect and heal children who are going through the same kinds of traumatic, stressful events they went through as kids. They shared with me their stories about those experiences and the many health problems they experienced later as adults. They also expressed their hopes and offered to be part of a solution. The letters touched me, and when I read some of them aloud at a recent staff meeting of the Center for Youth Wellness, my colleagues and I cried together. We also were deeply inspired.

    Post written by Pritpal S Tamber   By far the greatest need in health care is for its leaders to think differently. It seems highly unlikely that more health care, as we know it today, will be sufficient to meet the rising...

    Post written by Andy DeLao   Last Thursday night I had the privilege of catching up with my friend and colleague Mike (@uscaspecialist) in Chicago. In the conversation we ended up on the topic of EHR/EMR and meaningful use. We were discussing the...

      1. Who Keeps Track If Your Surgery Goes Well Or Fails? ( NPR ) 2. MediKidz: Super Heroes for Health Education. ( HealthWorks Collective ) 3. Your Next Doctor's Visit Might Be Through An iPhone. ( Forbes ) 4. Findings from a Survey of Health Care Delivery...

  Sharing Health Information   Post by Nancy Cappello, Ph.D.   Year after year, since I turned 40, I went for my mammography screening. Despite no family history of breast cancer and no known risk factors, my rigorous attention to the established breast screening protocol was my guarantee, in the unlikely event that I was diagnosed with breast cancer, it would be found at an early stage. It was a cold, dreary, snowy evening in 2004 when my breast surgeon disclosed the biopsy results from the ridge that was felt by my gynecologist within six weeks of my 11th normal mammography report. Dazed by her report, "You have invasive breast cancer," a fog immediately engulfed my mind that did not dissipate for months.