Pivot-Redesigning-Glasses     Blog post written by Pivot Group Design   Mike Micallef appreciates design as a process of solving problems in what Director of Herman Miller Inc., his once coworker, Bill Dowell champions as “the arts of daily living”. Mike has Huntington’s disease. Five years ago, he and his wife Vickie improved their 20-year-old Mississauga condo to test and refine ideas, products and services that would enable him to enjoy life with dignity despite his deteriorating condition.   [caption id="attachment_4866" align="alignnone" width="300"]Mike Micallef Mike Micallef[/caption]

    Post written by Nancy Cappello, Ph.D.   I was an excellent student. I loved learning, meeting up with my playmates, and socializing with my teachers. Within a few days of kindergarten, I discovered my destiny - I was going to be a...

    Blog post written by Pritpal S Tamber   In this post, I am reproducing a chapter from The Alpine Review by Charles Leadbeater. He argues that creating the health systems of tomorrow will mean learning from the developing world, so-called reverse-innovation. He also argues...

  Kay-Eron-Mobility   A Q&A With Dr. Mark Blatt by Kay Eron   Mobile technology and its potential impact on healthcare is a hot topic, and for good reason. With new sensors, medical devices and end-to-end solutions constantly being unveiled as the “next big thing,” the growing focus on technology is understandable. While mobile technology is key to improving anytime, anywhere access to care and reducing costs, personalized care, better patient outcomes and a new model of care will always rely on a personal and collaborative relationship between doctor and patient. Recently, I sat down with Dr. Mark Blatt, a family physician and early adopter of technology prior to becoming Intel’s Worldwide Medical Director, to get his unique perspective on mobile device innovation, the patient-doctor experience and the potential impact on a new model of care.

    An elderly man pushes an elderly woman across the brown and blue carpet of the pedestrian subway connecting the Mayo Clinic Campus in Rochester, Minnesota. Husband and wife, I would guess, because they don’t speak to each other as they...

    Post written by Nancy Cappello, Ph.D.   I was on-deck at the set of Better Connecticut in June, 2014 getting ready to discuss, yet again, my dense breasts and the Mission of Are You Dense, Inc. to promote our upcoming MusicFest Fundraiser. Multitasking as usual, I...

    Post written by Pritpal S. Tamber   I’m a reductionist at heart so let’s start with a number – 20. This is the percentage that health care contributes to our health, according to Nancy Adler of the University of California, San Francisco. She was writing for...

  What does it take to do the obvious?   Post written by Susan Mazer, Ph.D.   So much research, and so little traction!  That is what’s been happening with strong data supporting the effective use of music with people with dementia. There is even research that points to the characteristics that music must have to help mitigate anxiety and stress for people with dementia, as well as patients in hospitals.  And, yet, it is still considered an exception to usual and customary care.

What does it take to do the obvious?

  Providers Need to Practice Goal Directed Design   Post written by Joyce Lee   I take care of children with type 1 diabetes in my clinic, and in comparison with other chronic diseases, there is an abundance of health data available about my patients. Blood glucose meters and continuous glucose monitoring systems provide anywhere from 4 up to 300+ blood glucose measures a day; insulin is being dosed anywhere from 4 to 12 insulin times a day, and carbohydrate information can be infinite with every meal and snack ingested. Furthermore, at the quarterly medical visits we have with our patients, there are additional measures available like Hemoglobin A1c, a blood test which provides the average blood glucose level over a 3 month period. We as healthcare providers tend to come from scientific and statistical backgrounds, and we have very little training in the psychosocial and emotional management of diabetes. Therefore, we have a tendency to focus on the numeric aspects of diabetes. As a result, the typical interaction that happens between the healthcare provider and the patients and caregivers of individuals with type 1 diabetes goes something like this: