BarnRaise-B-log-Header     Access to quality healthcare is a universal issue. In Chicago, proper healthcare services are still inaccessible to many people. At BarnRaise this year healthcare practitioners, designers, health care administrators, graduate students, and beyond are invited to participate together reexamining the patient user journey in the access to care space with this timely conversation and co-creation of human-centered opportunities for impact. We chat with the co-directors of BarnRaise, Ellie Eberts and Jenni Schneiderman about their experience in design and health care, and what awaits us at BarnRaise this year. Listen to the great chat after the break:  

    Post written by Pritpal S. Tamber   I’m a reductionist at heart so let’s start with a number – 20. This is the percentage that health care contributes to our health, according to Nancy Adler of the University of California, San Francisco. She was writing for...

  Providers Need to Practice Goal Directed Design   Post written by Joyce Lee   I take care of children with type 1 diabetes in my clinic, and in comparison with other chronic diseases, there is an abundance of health data available about my patients. Blood glucose meters and continuous glucose monitoring systems provide anywhere from 4 up to 300+ blood glucose measures a day; insulin is being dosed anywhere from 4 to 12 insulin times a day, and carbohydrate information can be infinite with every meal and snack ingested. Furthermore, at the quarterly medical visits we have with our patients, there are additional measures available like Hemoglobin A1c, a blood test which provides the average blood glucose level over a 3 month period. We as healthcare providers tend to come from scientific and statistical backgrounds, and we have very little training in the psychosocial and emotional management of diabetes. Therefore, we have a tendency to focus on the numeric aspects of diabetes. As a result, the typical interaction that happens between the healthcare provider and the patients and caregivers of individuals with type 1 diabetes goes something like this:

    Post written by Pritpal S Tamber   I was in the Netherlands a few weeks ago and met a small group of people trying to think courageously about the future of health. It was invigorating to see such bravery, often in the face...

  Saving the world one design at a time     After reading former CFI Fellow Samantha Dempsey's article in Scientific America, "How Design Can Improve Health Care for Everyone," we knew we had to connect on Skype and pick her brain! Samantha brings great insight into the worlds between design and health care, working as an Experience Designer for Mad*Pow. She brought some incredible thoughts to the conversation, and we hope you enjoy listening after the break.  
  Health Care Isn't Rocket Science   Post written by Andy DeLao   After spending a day at the Chateau De Versailles at a Design Thinking Bootcamp For Healthcare, my team came back together to go over our interviews, share the stories, write down our observations, and to share any photographs, video, or other items we may have collected as part of our immersion. We then took all of our information and went into another room where we saw this on the wall:

      Post written by Gregory Thomas.    For purposes of this paper, I will refer to “client” as anyone that is a healthcare practitioner or a patient.   As a designer working in the healthcare arena, I am always looking for the next best technology...

    Post Written by Sumi Hansen   Can you imagine a Smart Operating Room that assists hospital staff by mapping out equipment placement on an illuminated floor? Or an Operating Table Platform that snaps into multiple configurations? Or a Smart Wall that displays...

  Fitsi Health   The idea for Fitsi is simply to give patients more. They not only made it easy for patients to clean their hands but also gave them a place to store their phones, glasses and access to comfort items like lip balm and moisturizer. It is a product designed to help patients feel more independent but also save nurses time. The opportunities for improving the patient experience are vast. Just ask any doctor or nurse and he/she will tell you several improvements that could be made. This experience has taught the team at Fitsi that some of the best ideas for new healthcare products come from empowering those on the frontlines. It is a lot of work but belief that better design means better care, and makes everyone excited to be making a real impact in patients lives. The opportunities are endless, and listen to the whole conversation after the break!  

    Post by Andy DeLao (@cancergeek)     The other day I was catching up on the morning news, articles, and discussion when I happened to come across a post from Tom Peters. (@Tom_Peters) As Tom often does so eloquently, he pointed out the reality that...