Post Written By Meghan Zimmerman At the end of September, I had the opportunity to attend the Mayo Transform Conference. It was a remarkable opportunity to talk about improving the patient care experience with healthcare practitioners, designers, engineers, patients, educators, and...

Post Written By Samantha Dempsey and Ciara Taylor of Mad*Pow The room tingled with the energy and anticipation of a hundred designers, thinkers, and community activists. Though the room was small, every seat was filled, and all the people leaned eagerly forward...

Post Written By Philip Kersten American cities have achieved the intentions of their design with outstanding success. Economic growth and urban expansion has been a benefit for American businesses for decades and the design of the cities we live in has...

Post Written By Megan Zimmerman All children need an environment that supports their health and wellbeing. Kids need loving families who nurture their daily needs, schools that engage their minds, and safe homes and communities to live in and grow. When...

Post Written By Pritpal S Tamber The Creating Health Collaborative has published its first book. Communities Creating Health packages all of the articles from our recent series on Stanford Social Innovation Review (SSIR), and includes a Foreword by Sir Harry Burns. It’s available from all online...

The Future of Health    Guest Post Written By Dr. Pritpal S Tamber There was a moment, when I was sitting stage-side at TEDMED 2013, when I saw the future of health. It wasn’t bright, it wasn’t full of answers; it was complex, plural and a constant struggle. And yet it was full of collegiality, hope and respect. Three talks in particular, truly unravelled me. Sally Okun laid bare how clinicians and patients have completely different ways to describe their illnesses, essentially limiting how much we understand of each other. America Bracho shared how she used members of the community to help decide and shape what health messages to deliver with the local Latino community. Lastly, Sue-Desmond Hellman shrugged and said it was patients who’d decide what innovation is and that the medical profession and industry needed to let them in and accept the messiness of the creative process.