Guest blog post from Theresa Lewis, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs   U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar compared the evolution of Mayo Clinic to the evolution of the US in regard to medicine and research. First she acknowledged, “It wasn’t easy to turn a...

    Article originally posted on Edison Award's website, written by Mindy Manes.   The powerful connection between storytelling and innovation, and its potential for businesses, is already being tapped into by companies such as Microsoft, 3M, Kimberly-Clark and Procter & Gamble, who consider...

    Blog post written by Stacie Lewis, Bethel University student and Transform attendee Mark Bertolini knows how difficult it can be for a patient’s family to navigate the healthcare experience. When his son was diagnosed with a life-threatening illness, he had to...

  Post originally published on LinkedIn by Ron Amodeo   Luck is not a business strategy because it can't be reproduced, right? Certain words are a dilemma in business. Luck is one of those words. Luck is what most companies would love to have...

  Each year, Mayo Clinic’s Transform symposium offers a place for healthcare innovators to reimagine and redesign the current challenges facing healthcare. A keynote speaker at this year’s event, Vaughn Kauffman, discusses the impact of consumerism on the healthcare industry and...

  Guest Blog Post by 2013 Transform Presenter, Susan Mazer   I keep coming back to the patient experience as being elusive, difficult to nail down, and more difficult to actually make happen and control. Added to that is the role of the...

            While this quote doesn't refer to innovation, design thinking or health care directly, it's a valuable lesson we can all be reminded of time and time again: we can't rest on the laurels of our past successes. Much like baseball,...

  Guest blog post from Theresa Lewis, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs    “Healthcare does not make health.” That was a simple statement made by David Katz, M.D., M.P.H as he presented to the Transform audience. According to Katz, “There is a gap between what we know and what we do with what we know.” He goes on to explain, “We live in a world that has transformed around us, but not necessarily in a good way,” for example, people consume more calories and take part in less physical activity. Katz believes we need to “translate” what we know about being healthy and take action.  He admits, “No one thing we do will transform the problem!” He used an amazingly simple analogy- it’s like using sandbags at a levy. “One sandbag does not keep us dry!” We need to use multiple sandbags and work as a community to make an impact and be successful.