Post Written by Dominique Pandy   When Transform presenter Elisabeth Rosenthal, M.D. began writing Paying Till It Hurts for the New York Times, health care consumers readily sacrificed their privacy and offered up their own experiences so their stories could be told....

PillPack Podcast   What began with a common place question of, "What if?" at a weekend MIT Hacking Medicine event, TJ Parker (CEO and Co-Founder of PillPack) found his team had come out with a foundation that began the journey to birth PillPack: an online pharmacy delivering a personalized roll of pre-sorted medications, every two weeks to your door, along with a recyclable dispenser and any other medications that cannot be placed into packets, like liquids and inhalers. In their own words, "PillPack is a full service pharmacy that delivers a better, simpler experience through convenient packaging, modern technology, and personalized service." With utilizing design thinking and service design, Parker and his team of pharmacists and innovators have focused on the sole solution of delivering an incredible customer experience for those who manage multiple medications daily. We connected with Parker over Skype to learn more about their journey, as well as how design thinking changed the traditional career of a Pharmacist. Listen to our conversation with TJ Parker after the break:

    Post by Ronald Amodeo Our current knowledge traps business leaders from rapidly assimilating something new. What heuristic can help? At a TED conference in 2006, Hans Rosling (Professor of International Health at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden) described a "pre-test" he had given...

    Post Written By Nitya Chandiramani   “You have been diagnosed with (insert disease).” Those six simple words that physicians so easily declare can transform an individual from a powerful person to a powerless patient. That was the experience encountered by social scientist...

How do you change culture?

Post originally featured on Pritpal Tamber's website.

It’s our lifestyles that are the problem. Our habits are making us sick. Our cultural norms are fueling the rise in chronic conditions. The solution is simple: we have to change our culture. We've all heard versions of this message but its alleged simplicity is also its absurdity. What is culture? Where does it come from? And how does it change? I've heard it said that our culture resides in the stories we tell. Although I can understand that, I have always struggled to see it as a target for intervention. And yet, if culture really is at the heart of what’s making us sick, we have no choice but to explore it as an option. The question is, how?

    We want to know: What are your most motivating and inspirational quotes for you? Share with us in the comments below, or send us a tweet to @MayoInnovation!     ________...

  Better Outcomes By Design   Post Written by Philip Kersten   Thinking disruptively is not something society typically encourages--or rewards. The desire to change something that already works is an odd drive that has been opposed by those of the mindset that if something isn’t broken it shouldn’t be fixed. However, this desire to change--and improve upon--current models of an existing system is exactly what the Mayo Clinic’s Center for Innovation (CFI) encourages and hopes to cultivate.
  Connecting the dots in healthcare social media   Social media in healthcare has, and continues to, radically transform the industry by making old boundaries disappear and connecting people who previously could have never connected before. When Twitter was in it's infancy, Audun Utengen (former Transform presenter) and some friends started to see the potential in utilizing this communication tool, and started cataloging conversations that were taking place by specific hashtags throughout the Twitter sphere. With over 6,000 health-related hashtags now being tracked and searchable, Symplur has become an invaluable resource to connect patients and providers around the world in ways previously unseen. Twitter chats with patients connecting over rare diseases, Journal clubs for providers to learn together, conversations from every area of the globe are put together and saved on Symplur's platform that is free to explore. But don't take our word for it, listen to our conversation with Audun after the break.
MK Czerwiec, a Transform 2013 presenter, is back again with our very own Nic Breutzman, to illustrate how comics work in the patient-provider relationship. MK has been living the mission of using comics as a tool in health care as a tool for communication and healing, and the comic below does the talking best.   MK 1