Post Written By Nancy Cappello In 2004, I was diagnosed with advanced stage 3C breast cancer. My 2.5 cm tumor, illuminated on ultrasound, was invisible by mammogram. Stunned that my yearly mammogram, just six weeks earlier, did not reveal my cancer, which metastasized to...

Post Written By Nancy Cappello It was a stunning beach setting for an evening of empowerment and education as Dr. Richard Reitherman and I tag teamed to discuss breast health, dense breasts and breast cancer screening. The evening began with a...

      Post written by Nancy Cappello, Ph.D   Meet Jan and Cindy -- two women who are similar in several ways. Both are mothers, wives, dutiful and health-conscious patients. Each had a mother with breast cancer; each never missed their yearly mammography screening and, like 40 percent...

  Sharing Health Information   Post by Nancy Cappello, Ph.D.   Year after year, since I turned 40, I went for my mammography screening. Despite no family history of breast cancer and no known risk factors, my rigorous attention to the established breast screening protocol was my guarantee, in the unlikely event that I was diagnosed with breast cancer, it would be found at an early stage. It was a cold, dreary, snowy evening in 2004 when my breast surgeon disclosed the biopsy results from the ridge that was felt by my gynecologist within six weeks of my 11th normal mammography report. Dazed by her report, "You have invasive breast cancer," a fog immediately engulfed my mind that did not dissipate for months.
Dr.Pruthi_BlogPost   “Can you help me connect?” was all it took for Dan O’Neil, Sr. Project Manager at the Center for Innovation to jump into ‘help mode’ and assist. Dr. Pruthi, Medical Director of Patient Experience at Mayo Clinic and the newly named physician lead of the Center for Innovation Connected Care Platform, embraces new methods and technologies to reach people without the boundaries of time and travel. This bit of serendipity revealed an even deeper connection between Shattuck-St. Mary’s School and Mayo Clinic then the team ever imagined simply because she found herself caught between meetings and away from her office (where normally such connections take place for Dr. Pruthi). Once connected, on-screen was a Harry Potter-like auditorium filled with upper class students from Shattuck-St. Mary’s School, located in nearby Faribault, and the lesson this day was on breast cancer, in particular, the prevalence of breast cancer in both women and men, how to prevent and monitor our own bodies for signs of concern, and what to do when you see or feel a change in your body. They also discussed how activities like yoga and meditation can help in both treatment and prevention. Turns out Maren LaLiberty, M.D., and the Director of the newly established Bioscience Program at Shattauck-St. Mary’s, had reached out to Dr. Pruthi two years ago when the girls soccer team wanted to do a service learning project focused on breast cancer. In doing their research, they learned about Dr. Pruthi’s work on yoga and wellness activities focused on breast cancer prevention and recovery. Since their initial meeting the girls soccer team has raised over $4,000 for Mayo Clinic, supporting this research.