Post originally found on Victor Montori's Minimally Disruptive Medicine Blog   A patient with type 2 diabetes could spend a little over two hours a day on average following all doctors’ recommendations [1]. About 45% of the population has at least one chronic condition. In...

      Post written by Susan Mazer, Ph.D.   All of our patients’ opinions and perceptions are evidence-based.  Each of us uses deductive reasoning to make predictions into the immediate future. Deductive reasoning is adding up what we know to arrive and understand what...

    Post written by Casey Quinlan   I’ve spent a good portion on the healthcare equivalent of the political stump – called the “rubber chicken circuit” in political circles. Thankfully, there was no actual rubber chicken served during these sojourns, although there was...

    Post written by Susan Mazer, Ph.D.   Can listening to the wrong type of music cause accidents or medical errors? The Israeli Daily paper Haartetz reported this week that Warren Brodsky, Director of Music Psychology in the Department of the Arts at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev,...

  5 Telltale signs the doctor-patient relationship needs marriage counceling   Post written by Casey Quinlan   The healthcare system is all about building patient engagement lately.Which makes me ask: if we get to engagement, will we ever get married? And if we do … will we wind up needing marriage counseling? Short answer: we already need marriage counseling, and we’re not even officially engaged yet. Herewith is the evidence that the doctor (and health system)-patient relationship needs marriage counseling, adapted from a post on YourTango.com by life & relationship coach Debra Smouse.

    Post written by Casey Quinlan   Now that I have, for my sins, been tagged as a patient engagement expert, I figure that entitles me to the occasional rant on the topic of the healthcare system — particularly the US iteration thereof — and its utter inability...

      Post written by Nancy Cappello, Ph.D   Meet Jan and Cindy -- two women who are similar in several ways. Both are mothers, wives, dutiful and health-conscious patients. Each had a mother with breast cancer; each never missed their yearly mammography screening and, like 40 percent...

  What does it take to do the obvious?   Post written by Susan Mazer, Ph.D.   So much research, and so little traction!  That is what’s been happening with strong data supporting the effective use of music with people with dementia. There is even research that points to the characteristics that music must have to help mitigate anxiety and stress for people with dementia, as well as patients in hospitals.  And, yet, it is still considered an exception to usual and customary care.

What does it take to do the obvious?

    Post written by Casey Quinlan   It’s been a fun week here in Mighty Casey Media Land. We kicked off the week a little early (on Sunday) – the 411 on that is available here, and some of the social exhaust is available...