Post Written By Dr. Nick Binns I am a family physician in New Zealand attending the Techstars ++ Mayo immersion program. I am here as a representative of Melon Health and also of my employer in New Zealand, Midlands Health. As well...

  Post written by Dana Lewis   I had a conversation this week with someone in the CGM in the Cloud Facebook group, after they indicated they wouldn’t be (or maybe weren’t interested in) joining the “dev” group for#OpenAPS – and it’s a...

  Post written by Andy DeLaO   This is a picture of the Lokai (@livelokai) bracelets that I wear on a daily basis. I happen to have the clear (original), the blue (water conservation), and the green/brown (world wild life) bracelets. I quit wearing...

      Post written by Kat Quinn, M.B.A.   Doximple is a revolutionary platform that matches healthcare consumers and small businesses with cash-based providers. The user-friendly marketplace allows consumers to save time and reduce out-of-pocket expenses, by shopping and comparing services and upfront cash prices...

      Post written by Casey Quinlan   I have this tattooed, 3 by 3 inches, on my chest. It scans about 50% of the time, depending on my body position and lighting conditions - when it works, it opens a page on one...

    Post written by Susan Mazer     We are a reductionist culture. Whatever the words are, we come up with an acronym. Whatever the catastrophe, we love headlines. Whatever the issue, we reduce to the shortest most minimal understanding. And, when it comes to...

  Health Literacy is our own fault     Post written by Kathy Kastner   I couldn’t believe my ears when Dr Diane Meier said:  

Health Literacy is not a patient problem: it’s a health care professional’s problem.

  I could barely tweet this radical idea, riveted as I was to the Institute of Medicine’s webcast, Health Literacy and Palliative Care. I could have kissed Dr Meier, Director, Center to Advance Palliative Care right there on  the computer screen.  In the words of the Beatles, these were words I longed to hear.
  Victor-Montori---Balancing-Competing-Priorities   Post originally found on Victor Montori's Minimally Disruptive Medicine Blog   The high treatment burden in chronic respiratory illness is very real. As a 28 year old living with Cystic Fibrosis (CF), when healthy I am usually on 16+ medications and engage in over 2 hours of treatments daily. I currently take up to 47 tablets daily, depending on my food intake. I usually have 1-2 hospital admissions per year lasting 10-14 days each, for routine intravenous antibiotics and intense chest physiotherapy to clear out my lungs. Of course, these figures skyrocket when I have an exacerbation. This treatment schedule isn’t always easy to manage when integrated into the contextt of trying to live a “normal” life; including professional employment, post graduate studies, social affairs, playing mum to two beloved dogs, maintaining a house and being a fabulous wife.  I’d like to provide some further insights into what the treatment burden involves for individuals like myself.

    Post written by Casey Quinlan   I’ve been heard here on the topic of getting a barcode tattooed on my neck to avoid having to fill out another one of those damned forms-on-a-clipboard at a medical provider’s office. In late 2013, I had a V-8...