HUMAN-CENTERED DESIGN AND THE HOSPITAL

9 Action Principles to Employ for Improved Patient Satisfaction

 

Human-Centered Design and the Hospital: Building effective and positive experiences

Blog post written by Center for Innovation Designer Matthew Moore

 

Human-centered design, known in some circles as user-centered design, gets health care administrators out of the conference room, in partnership with the front-line staff. While at first glance, using human-centered design seems more complex and more costly than the traditional way of doing things, in the long term, it’s less complex, it reduces costs and it increases patient satisfaction. Here’s how.

 

Why employ these action principles

Human-centered design starts with the people you’re designing for and ends with new solutions tailored to their needs. Users need not accommodate their behaviors, rather the product is optimized for the users. This results in improved outcomes, increased adoption rates, reduced long-term cost and improved staff and patient satisfaction.

At the heart of our work is the experience – for both patients and staff. To optimize that, we talk with patients and staff, we examine process and systems, and we observe activity in the current space and environment, all within the context of what is happening around the patient. We work to develop solutions that meet the 30,000-foot direction as well as the inevitably highly tactical needs of patients and staff.

At the heart of our work is the experience

– for both patients and staff.

Human-centered design starts with the people you’re designing for and ends with new solutions tailored to their needs.

To change the experience, we need to understand patient and staff needs and develop concepts iteratively with patient and staff input. Our methods are simple and effective: observation, interviews, focus group and surveys. With accumulated data, we embark on active research to test and refine concepts. We employ user testing, create mock ups and conduct workshops with end-users who help define needs, identify concepts and refine concepts.

 

Principles for building effective and positive experience

  1. Talk less, do more – and listen.
  2. Don’t guess – observe and ask.
  3. Iterate – test, refine, repeat.
  4. Create a time box and focus – keep your eye on your goal.
  5. Constraints are good – they help focus the work.
  6. Understand existing practicalities of diffusion – and design toward them.
  7. Generating ideas and reacting to ideas are VERY different things – watch for the difference.
  8. Consensus is good or bad – “rounding off” the edges can lose important advantages.
  9. Include a productive irritant on the team.

 

Are you ready to get out of the conference room, create more effective patient experiences and reduce costs?